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PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2013 3:29 pm 
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FYI - Craig Newhouse (username fourseasoncomfortCOOLING ) is going to be moderating this thread related to questions on HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning)


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2013 2:07 am 
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Rick Di Lorenzo wrote:
FYI - Craig Newhouse (username fourseasoncomfortCOOLING ) is going to be moderating this thread related to questions on HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning)

Thanks Rick,

Four Season Comfort Heating & Cooling has been very fortunate to of been able to serve the members of the Hawthorne Village Community and forum for the past 7 years. We welcome any questions from the members of this forum related to HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning). Please just post your HVAC related questions here and we would be pleased to assist.

Some of our client testimonials may be found here.

viewtopic.php?t=24763
http://fourseasoncomfort.homestars.com/
http://www.estatesofcreditridge.net/fee ... -t674.html

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2013 12:02 pm 
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Location: Hawthorne Village
Craig,

What can you tell us about retrofit zoning systems?

We have a large bungalow with a lot of south/west facing windows and find that there are some fairly big temperature swings on some days (i.e. rooms on the sunny side of the house heat up while other rooms stay cold because the thermostat in the main part of the house never gets triggered - the opposite occurs in the summer as we need to close off vents at the front of the house to avoid these rooms turning into meat lockers when the a/c runs all the time).

We're thinking that a 3 (or 4?) zone system would solve the problem as we could isolate the main floor from the basement and then split the main floor into 2 different zones (living vs. sleeping areas). Is there a particular brand/system that you'd recommend and what kind of price range would we be looking at for the installation?


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 21, 2013 7:12 am 
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Great question mt_42,

This is a common problem particularly in homes with south & west exposure. Having a home with large windows backing S/SW can be beneficial during heating season as the natural sunlight will heat the rooms where the direct sunlight is entering. This is a problem during the summer months as it causes your AC to work overtime to maintain set points. Usually before I recommend installing a zoning system, upon inspection we can sometimes make a few recommendations to balance the temperature in your home. Some recommendations are.

- balance vents so more conditioned air is delivered appropriately to each room that is uncomfortable.
- relocate thermostat
- run circulation fan constantly
-during the summer months(cooling) best sure to cover windows with exposure to direct sunlight(shutters are recommended or curtains with a aggressive black out lining)

If the above listed recommendations does not improve your home comfort, then a zoning system would be recommended. Upon inspection we could determine how may zones would be required to balance temperature in your home. We would recommend a Honeywell zoning system. It is best if your basement is unfinished as well.

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PostPosted: Sun May 05, 2013 7:51 pm 
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Location: Milton
Hi Craig,
I purchased an A/C from you last year and you recommended annual maintenance on it. Do you do it or do you have a company/individual that you recommend?

Thanks,

Art


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PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2013 7:20 am 
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Hi Art,

Thanks for your business and for your question.
If we installed your AC last year you may require a visual inspection after year 5 as well as checking pressures. If your AC is installed correctly initially maintenance should be very minimal. The most important maintenance can be performed by simply making sure that your furnace filter is changed on a regular basis to ensure your A-coil in your furnace is kept free of debris which can have a negative effect on cooling. Also ensure your condensor coil(on the outside of your home) is also kept clean from excessive dust, grass etc... This can be done by using a garden hose by applying water pressure to clean.

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viewtopic.php?t=24763


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2013 3:03 pm 
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I have a new Model 6 Mattamy.... 1750sq.

I've been told a by 2 different people that a 2ton is prefect for the home, and another 1 one person that a 2.5 ton is perfect for my home.

With a smaller home is there a real benefit to going to a 2.5 ton unit?

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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2013 6:47 pm 
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Wyl wrote:
I have a new Model 6 Mattamy.... 1750sq.

I've been told a by 2 different people that a 2ton is prefect for the home, and another 1 one person that a 2.5 ton is perfect for my home.

With a smaller home is there a real benefit to going to a 2.5 ton unit?


Thanks for your question Wyl,
It is recommended that we perform an on site inspection to determine appropriate sizing however we have installed AC units in many Mattamy plan 6 homes. I agree the correct sizing of your AC unit should be a 24,000 btu or 2 ton even with 9ft upgraded ceilings on the 2nd level and south exposure. Im not sure why a HVAC contractor would suggest a 2.5 ton AC for your home as this will be oversized and cause short cycling. Short cycling is when an AC has been oversized for your home. The negative effect is that the AC will turn on satisfying setpoint prematurely causing poor air flow in your home, particularly on the 2nd level.
This is why it is important to do your research when finding a qualified, reputable company for your HVAC needs. Unfortunately there are many fly by night companies that offer you an unbelievable price for your AC unit but fail to draw ESA permits, dont assume your furnace warranty and disappear once you have a furnace or AC issue.

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PostPosted: Wed May 22, 2013 11:59 am 
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Hi Craig,

Question on the return located in the basement. When running the A/C (which was installed by you guys of course 8) ), I've heard a couple of conventions on whether to leave it open or closed. I've heard leaving it open as it allows it to draw the already cooler air in the basement so the HVAC system won't have to work as hard. I've also heard about leaving it closed so it allows the HVAC system to draw the warmer air throughout the other parts of the house allowing for better cooling of the house. What's your take on this?


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PostPosted: Wed May 22, 2013 7:46 pm 
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Gumz wrote:
Hi Craig,

Question on the return located in the basement. When running the A/C (which was installed by you guys of course 8) ), I've heard a couple of conventions on whether to leave it open or closed. I've heard leaving it open as it allows it to draw the already cooler air in the basement so the HVAC system won't have to work as hard. I've also heard about leaving it closed so it allows the HVAC system to draw the warmer air throughout the other parts of the house allowing for better cooling of the house. What's your take on this?


HI Gumz,

Great question. Im on the fence on this one, there is no right or wrong anwser it is dependant on the situation. I will give you the facts, then you may base your decision on that.
Opening the return in the basement will provide more return air flow for your furnace however if your basement is unfinished and you have alot of concrete dust having the return in basement opened fully can result in spreading this dust throughout your home. However a good filter could help eliminate this without sacrificing airflow. I would suggest opening it part way perhaps to balance the return so you have maximum air flow through your furnace. The reality is each home is unique in its design, exposure, location of the furnace, size and location of windows and will require its own solution to effectively balance the supply and return airflow to maximize cooling particularly to the 2nd level.

Thank you for your business and please let me know if you need additional explanation as I would be pleased to discuss about your particular situation.

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viewtopic.php?t=24763


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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2013 9:59 am 
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Two questions:

1. I upgraded the builder standard furnace to a Carrier 58MVP; do I have to be concerned about the density of the air filters that I use? I understand that some of the higher performance filters may restrict airflow too much and could cause issues. Is this correct and if so where can I find out what's appropriate?

2. I have a water heater that was installed in 2003; I know code has changed on venting pipes. When the existing unit gets replaced does this mean that the pipe needs replacing? Obviously a finished basement makes this more difficult.

Thanks in advance.


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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2013 10:28 am 
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Thanks for your questions Gumby.

I would recommend 2 different types of filters dependant on the season.
For the heating season I would recommend the 15x25x1 3M filter. During the air conditioning season I would recommend a less aggressive filter such as the blue 15x25x1 filters. It is important to have maximum airflow on the return side as we want as much air flow of the conditioned air as possible to the upstairs 2nd level.

Yes, when changing a direct vent HWT or furnace, 636 piping must be used in order to meet code. This should be included in the pricing that a contractor quotes to change either the furnace or HWT as it is the contractors responsibility to ensure the equipment is installed to code.

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viewtopic.php?t=24763


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 03, 2013 7:35 am 
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How much water is dumped out of a furnace/forced air unit when in use? the temperature in my house is great and the humidity is a little in the dry side but ok. but it seems like there is always water trickling out.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 7:26 am 
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King Luis wrote:
How much water is dumped out of a furnace/forced air unit when in use? the temperature in my house is great and the humidity is a little in the dry side but ok. but it seems like there is always water trickling out.


Thanks for your question King Luis.

The amount of water coming from your AC coil drain line depends on what the level of humidity is in your home. If the relative humidity is above 60% during the cooling season your A coil will be removing a large amount of humidity from the air. This will result in a steady stream of water from the A coil into your drain conditioning the air, hence making it cool in your home.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 7:03 am 
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Hi,

I have a mattamy townhouse and have Hi-velocity furnace/Lenox AC installed. The furnace model is HE-52H. I need to know what size air filter fits in this furnace?

I removed the old one and it says 16x16x1 which is not in the market and stores havent heard about this size either.

THis is 5yrs new house and I cannot believe they will install furnace that takes such a weird size air filter.

Any help would be highly appreciated.

Thanks
Ash


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